Foreword TO VOLUME 2

 
CHAPTER 8   Deviating resolutions of the dominant 7th chord
137
 

LESSON 39
LESSON 40
LESSON 41
LESSON 42
LESSON 43
LESSON 44




LESSON 45

The deceptive cadence V7 —> VI
Dominant 7th chord —> raised IV
Dominant 7th chord on lowered VII
The double ending
The added dominant 7th chord
More deviating resolutions of the dominant 7th chord
• a minor third apart
• a major third apart
• a whole step apart
• a half step apart
Double dominant —> 6/4 chord, and its reharmonization
137
140
141
144
146
147
147
149
150
151
153

CHAPTER 9   The turnaround, and something about form

157

  LESSON 46
LESSON 47
LESSON 48



LESSON 49







The TA to the tonic in major and minor
TA to the IInd degree in major and minor
More frequently occurring turn arounds
• TA to IV
• TA from major to relative minor and vice versa
• TA to the dominant 7th chord on VI
Other kinds of TA
• TA to IV in an alla breve or fast 4/4 meter
• TA to I in an alla breve or fast 4/4 meter
• TA to the relative minor in an alla breve or fast 4/4 meter
• two-bar TA to the raised IV
• repeat without TA
• TA from major to parallel minor and the cross relation
• TA to the TR double dominant

158
161
164
164
164
166
166
166
167
168
168
169
170
170
CHAPTER 10   Piano-style harmony with silent bass
173
 

LESSON 50
LESSON 51

LESSON 52
LESSON 53
LESSON 54

LESSON 55




The thickened line, continued  
Special thickened line   
• perfect parallel harmony
Static chords with silent bass
Minor 7th and half diminished chords with silent bass
Dominant 7th chord with silent bass  
• dominant 7th chord with 5 as lowest tone
Dominant chain with silent bass
• tone families of fifth and root tone
• tone families as moving tones
• tone families in the thickened line
More examples to practice  
173
181
184
189
195
198
200
202
203
207
208
211
CHAPTER 11   The relation melody-harmony

217

 














LESSON 56




LESSON 57
LESSON 58




LESSON 59



LESSON 60







What do we hear?
1. Construction of most applied chords in jazz
2. The right progression of chords
3. Embellishing chords and their application
4. Meter and harmonic rhythm
5. The key
6. The bass also forms a melody
7. The fourth in a major chord
8. Tonal excursions to family
9. Doubling of bass and melody
10. Unfavourably applied chord extensions and alterations
11. Usefulness of a chord
12. Arpeggiated chords in the melody
13. Embellishing tones in the melody
14. Editing chord symbols from a commercial song sheet
The vertical harmonic element
A. Chord diagrams
• Summary of the systeem
B. Aplication of the vertical harmonic element
The horizontal harmonic element
Excursions to family VI and III
• to VI in major
to VI in minor  
• to III in major
• to III in minor
Excursions to family V and IV
• to the dominant key (V)
• to the subdominant keys, family IV and II
• the target chord
Substitute for II-V and the tritone II-V progression
• leading tone in the melody
• m7/13 chord
• TR dominant 7th chord
• TR II -V progression
• –13 in the melody
• –10 and –9 in the melody
• +11 in the melody
218
220
220
220
221
221
223
223
223
223
223
224
224
224
224
226
226
230
232
237
245
245
246
248
250
255
255
257
259
265
265
265
265
266
266
267
267
CHAPTER 12   Miscellaneous

273

  12.1
12.2

12.3
12.4
12.5
12.6
12.7
Rhythm and practice of piano accompaniment
12. 2 The piano intro
• examples of four-bar intros
Scales and modes
Overtones, Superimposed Triads, and the Mystic Chord
The Circle of Fifths, Axis Cross System, and Octotonics
The harmonies of the blues
A few tips and suggestions

273
276
277
278
282
288
290
295

APPENDIX

Overview of the resolution of augmented triads on the degrees of the key family of C (C-E-Ab)


298

reference.Index.volume 2

Ind. 1-6